Positivism

Positivism 120x150 Positivism

Positivism as a philosophy adheres to the view that only “factual” knowledge gained through observation (the senses), including measurement, is trustworthy. In positivism studies the role of the researcher is limited to data collection and interpretation through objective approach and the research findings are usually observable and quantifiable.

According to the principles of positivism, it depends on quantifiable observations that lead themselves to statistical analysis. It has been noted that “as a philosophy, positivism is in accordance with the empiricist view that knowledge stems from human experience. It has an atomistic, ontological view of the world as comprising discrete, observable elements and events that interact in an observable, determined and regular manner” (Collins, 2010, p.38).

Moreover, in positivism studies the researcher is independent form the study and there are no provisions for human interests within the study. Crowther and Lancaster (2008) inform that as a general rule, positivist studies usually adopt deductive approach, whereas inductive research approach is usually associated with a phenomenology philosophy. Moreover, positivism relates to the viewpoint that researcher needs to concentrate on facts, whereas phenomenology concentrates on the meaning and has provision for human interest.

Researchers warn that “if you assume a positivist approach to your study, then it is your belief that you are independent of your research and your research can be purely objective. Independent means that you maintain minimal interaction with your research participants when carrying out your research” (Wilson, 2010, p.10). In other words, studies with positivist paradigm are based purely on facts and consider the world to be external and objective.

It has been noted that “as a philosophy, positivism is in accordance with the empiricist view that knowledge stems from human experience. It has an atomistic, ontological view of the world as comprising discrete, observable elements and events that interact in an observable, determined and regular manner” (Collins, 2010, p.38).

The key features of positivism and social constructionism philosophical approaches are presented in  the following table by Ramanathan (2008).

Positivism Social Constructionism
The observer Must be independent Is part of what is being observed
Human interests Should be irrelevant Are the main drivers of science
Explanations Must demonstrate causality Aim to increase general understanding of the situation
Research progresses through Hypotheses and deductions Gather rich data from which ideas are induced
Concepts Need to be operationalised so that they can be measured Should incorporate stakeholder perspectives
Units of analysis Should be reduced to simplest terms May include the complexity of ‘whole’ situations
Generalisation through Statistical probability Theoretical abstraction
Sampling requires Large numbers selected randomly Small numbers of cases chosen for specific reasons

 

Alternatively, the differences between positivist and phenomenology paradigms are best illustrated by Easterby-Smith in the following manner:

  Positivist Paradigm Phenomenology  paradigm
Basic notions The world is perceived as external and objective

Independency of the observer

Value-free approach to science

The world is perceived to be socially constructed and subjective

Observer is considered a part of the object of observation

Human interests drives science

Responsibilities of researcher Focusing on facts

Causalities and fundamental laws are searched

Phenomenon are reduced to the simplest elements

Hypotheses formulation and testing them

To be focusing on meanings

Aiming to understand the meaning of events

Exploring the totality of each individual case

Ideas are developed by induction from data

Most suitable research methods Concepts have to be operationalised Using several methods in order to different aspects of phenomena
Sampling Samples have to be large Small samples are analysed in a greater depth or over longer period of time

 

References

Collins, H. (2011) “Creative Research: The Theory and Practice of Research for the Creative Industries” AVA Publications
Crowther, D. & Lancaster, G. (2008) “Research Methods: A Concise Introduction to Research in Management and Business Consultancy” Butterworth-Heinemann
Ramanathan, R, 2008, The Role of Organisational Change Management in Offshore Outsourcing of Information Technology Services, Universal Publishers